Solstice Permaculture Update

We’ve had challenging weather the last nine months: a record wet winter and now eight weeks with essentially no rain. This is exactly what climate change looks like and it’s extremely stressful for those in agriculture. Nonetheless, we’ve managed to get an annual garden in and we’re minding our 200 fruit trees carefully.

Tomatoes are ripening.

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Heaps of zucchinis.

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And beans.

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The corn is thriving in this hot, dry weather.

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We can’t pick and eat the strawberries fast enough.

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The same will soon be true of plums.

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Trees are laden even after significant thinning.

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Not so many peaches this year, but we look forward to a better peach season next year.

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We’re approaching 100 ducklings on the farm with more on the way.

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Sadly, it’s been our worst growing season for garlic. It was on track to be the best but rust set in during the last five weeks and stunted growth right when it is most important. It’s hugely discouraging to put in so much effort and not achieve the yield I was expecting.

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But in a world of climate change, this is ‘the new normal.’

 

Peace, Estwing