Tag Archives: featured

Early Summer Permaculture Update

It’s hot and dry already but we have not yet started irrigating the fruit trees. That could change in the coming weeks. In the meantime we’re enjoying a good fruit set in part thanks to our resident bees. These are early plums that will be ripe in about a month from now.

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Additionally, we’ve got plentiful grapes, apples, pears, peaches, guavas, olives, figs, feijoas, and for the first time quince. Flowering on the avocados is massive so we are hoping for good cross pollination there.

We’ve also had excellent germination of the Black Boy peach stones. We’ve potted up over 50 and still going.

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On the animal front we’re up to about 60 muscovy ducklings hatched along with 8 goat kids. One of the kunekune sows is pregnant and due in the next weeks. Chooks laying up a storm with a broody hen sitting on a dozen Wyandotte eggs.

Peace, Estwing

4-Dimensional Design: Master Class

4-Dimensional Design: Master Class

23rd April, 2020

Kaitiaki Farm, Whanganui

On our farm it takes a month to cut down a tree, six months to build a garden bed, and two years to plant avocados.

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Before and After

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Building Beds

Time is the 4th dimension, and using it to our advantage saves effort, money, and fossil fuels while establishing and operating highly efficient and regenerative systems. Designing in 4 dimensions maximizes the value of available resources and minimizes waste as well as the need for heavy equipment and a fat wallet. It’s working smarter instead of harder.

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In five years we have transformed a worn-out horse property into a fully integrated permaculture farm on a shoestring budget and essentially without the burning of fossil fuels. We engage a regenerative approach to food production on 5.1 hectares on the outskirts of Whanganui.

Before & After 4

The programme includes: water management; soil enhancement; wind protection; animal management; annual gardening; successional planning; integrating systems; off-farm inputs and outputs; other stuff we do.

1 pm to 5:30 pm. Afternoon tea included. $55 p/p, $85 couples.

Dinner and overnight accommodation available before the PINZ Annual Hui.

Register: theecoschool@gmail.com

 

Support Stream Restoration

Filled with inspiring images that can change the way you see the world, with practical examples of each permaculture design principle over the course of a month. Daily icons are reminders for garden activities that take advantage of the lunar cycles, supporting regular planting routines. The annual rainfall chart is a handy way to keep a weather record or an eye on events over the year.

Ethically produced using post-consumer recycled paper printed with vegetable based inks. Internationally relevant and filled with thought provoking images that support and reinforce your values every day of the year.

100% of profits go to charitable permaculture projects

$16.90 Post paid / 2 for $30

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Orders:  TheECOSchool@gmail.com

Permaculture Internship: Paying-It-Forward

Interns come to Kaitiaki Farm for 8 weeks at a time to earn a Permaculture Design Certificate. That’s not long enough to grow anything from seed to plate except radishes or maybe salad greens depending on the time of year. As a result, we’ve developed a form of ‘paying-it-forward’ from one group to the next in the annual garden, or even from season to season by making and freezing pesto or broad bean falafal or sliced peaches, loquats and feijoas.

One group plants tomatoes that they will never eat, but enjoys crown pumpkin, spaghetti squash, dried chilis, and dehydrated apples grown and prepared by other interns months earlier.

The most recent group has been able to experience much of the best aspects of harvest season and their work in the annual gardens has been relatively light. But instead they’ve been planting natives along the stream, helping put up firewood, and transitioning the beds to winter crops such as broad beans, brassicas and garlic. They have even helped organise and run a Curtain Bank for the Whanganui community, to help low-income families keep their homes warmer during the coming winter months.

Previous groups have helped with drainage on the land, built animal shelters and chicken tractors, and planted poplar poles, avocados, olives, and around 2,000 native plants. Each group makes compost that will be used by future groups and raises ducklings or chicks that they won’t see as full grown.

Paying-it-forward on Kaitiaki Farm may serve as an example of what is sorely lacking in much of the rest of contemporary human society. Instead of paying-it-forward we see rampant stealing from future generations in terms of biodiversity, climate, and financial debt.

Even during an 8-week permaculture internship one can only learn so much. So instead of trying to ‘teach’ heaps of ‘stuff’ we take the approach of helping to develop a more holistic vision and four-dimensional design thinking skills. As our interns plant vegetable seeds in the gardens and native seeds in pots in the nursery, as instructors we’re planting seeds of the ethical approach to ecological design that is permaculture. Once interns leave the farm we rely on them to spread out across the planet and pay-it-forward in communities worldwide. We need to make sure they are well nourished for such a weighty job.

Peace, Estwing

Kaitiaki Farm Work Study PDC Internship

 

Earn your Permaculture Design Certificate while working on a premier permaculture demonstration farm in New Zealand.

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Our work study internship programme is unique in the world of permaculture education in that it combines best practice teaching and learning with best practice regenerative land management.

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The programme balances content, process and reflection, while nurturing systems thinking skills. It’s about developing a way of thinking that recognizes the connections between diverse elements on the farm and how they interact in four dimensions (over time), along with the hands-on skills required to work effectively with cultivated ecologies.

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Kaitiaki Farm is an exemplar permaculture property that is blessed with a diverse array of microclimates and growing conditions. The 5.1 hectare (13 acre) property is located 4 km outside of Whanganui with a population of 43,000.

Along with holistic land management we also embrace appropriate technology, renewable energy and human-scale solutions.

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Many of our interns come with low or no rural skills. Motivation, a love of learning, and a strong work ethic are the most important elements for success at Kaitiaki.

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We spend a lot of time teaching and talking. This slows down our work but makes the internship what it is – an endless series of ‘teachable moments’. It is also the best way to earn a PDC. This type of learning experience is extremely rare anywhere in the world and would not come from a book or standard PDC course. That said, we have a huge library of great books and lots of connections locally and nationwide of practicing permaculturists.

Interns work three-ish full-ish days and two half days per week, with two days off.

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More details here: http://www.theecoschool.net/workstudy-permaculture-design-certificate.html

The ECO School

Whanganui, New Zealand

 

Inquiries: theecoschool at gmail dot com

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